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NARCAN Training

NARCAN Training Offered

NARCAN Training OfferedNarcan (naloxone) blocks or reverses the effects of opioid medication, including extreme drowsiness, slowed breathing, or loss of consciousness…(Narcan) is used to treat a narcotic overdose in an emergency situation.”¹

The availability of this life saving drug is increasing state by state as communities are desperately trying to catch up with the startling number of overdose deaths. Narcan’s availability is no longer limited to hospital ER’s only. Because of the increase in demand, availability has extended to police, emergency response professionals, school clinics, and even to those who know someone who is addicted and at risk. However, Narcan training is needed for those seeking the ability to carry and administer this drug.

Staten Island University Hospital, Boston Public Health, and Brandywine Counseling are just a few addiction treatment facilities that have taken that crucial extra step and are offering certified overdose prevention training, via Narcan, to their communities. First of all, attendees learn how to identify the signs of overdose. Attendees will then learn how to administer Narcan. Finally, at the completion of training they will receive a free rescue kit. ²,³

If you, or someone you know is interested in learning more about overdose prevention and Narcan training programs in your area please visit SAMHSA’s website.

1.) https://www.drugs.com/mtm/narcan.html

2.) http://www.brandywinecounseling.org/annoucements/narcan-training-classes

3.) http://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/Addiction-Services/prevention/Pages/Narcan-Program.aspx

4.) http://www.siuh.edu/Events-Calendar/Event-Details.aspx?Event=647

5.) http://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/treatment/naloxone

Telemedicine and Hepatitis Treatment

Thinking Outside the Clinic – Telemedicine and Hepatitis Treatment

People affected by substance use disorder often suffer from other physical or mental illnesses. Those in addiction treatment already face the challenges of consistently making it to treatment and staying sober. Co-occurring disorders like heroin addiction and Hepatitis C generate many additional obstacles which can lead to patients putting treatment of select health related issues (like hep C) on the back burner. Although this virus may not present the same urgency as withdrawal, “70%–85% for people who become infected with Hepatitis C, it becomes a long-term, chronic infection.” ¹

Telemedicine and Hepatitis Treatment Some addiction treatment providers are taking an extra step to ensure that their patients healthcare needs are addressed using telemedicine. This is defined by SAMHSA as “…Two-way, real time interactive communication between the patient, and the physician or practitioner at the distant site. This electronic communication means the use of interactive telecommunications equipment that includes, at a minimum, audio and video equipment…”² Providing this service to patients with the co-occurring disorders has been shown to help address the neglected portions of their personal healthcare.

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) recently awarded a 5 year, $7 million grant to a professor of medicine at University of Buffalo to support his efforts in addressing the spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among drug users who share needles.³ As our nation continues to deal with the opioid epidemic, Hepatitis C has increase immensely.  However, the UB study is presenting positive outcomes as a result of the virtual integration of telemedicine. Read more in the full article by UB³

1.) http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/

2.) http://www.samhsa.gov/section-223/care-coordination/telehealth-telemedicine

3.) http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2016/05/052.html#sthash.66i7HemH.dpuf

greenwich-house

Greenwich House, Inc. – NYC

About

Greenwich House was founded in 1902 to help Greenwich Village’s growing immigrant population adjust to life in New York City. While Greenwich Village has changed dramatically over the years, their mission has remained: to help individuals and families lead more fulfilling lives by offering social and health services, cultural and education programs and opportunities for civic involvement to New Yorkers of all ages and backgrounds. Each year, it provides nearly 12,000 New Yorkers with social, medical and cultural programs, all aimed at providing personal growth and enrichment. Since their founding, they have served nearly one million New Yorkers.

Greenwich House’s Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program provides individuals dependent on opioids, including heroin, with high-quality, personalized care to help overcome their addictions. Patients voluntarily come to the clinic and are treated with dignity and compassion as they receive individualized medical care, counseling and supportive services that help to improve their quality of life, promote self-sufficiency and connections within the community.

Learn more

Testimonial

“The treatment plan is fantastic! It makes it easier for me to be able to put a plan together. It is one of the greatest features! Also the psycho-social summary is direct and straight to the point.”    

– Intake Counselor

chasing heroin

REACH Ahead of Addiction

evergreen logo newsEvergreen Treatment Services (ETS) has been ahead of the opioid addiction treatment curve for over 20 years with their REACH Program. This program focuses on serving the homeless and addicted with outreach and in-depth case management using a variety of harm-reduction approaches. The primary goal is to meet clients where they are in their recovery process, and ultimately  help them to achieve successful and healthy lives. An important part of REACH services is that they are not contingent upon a client’s sobriety or abstinence. This allows addicted participants the opportunity to keep fighting for their recovery even though they may have been overcome by their addiction during the process.

Sound familiar? The principles of the REACH program are much like that of the later established LEAD Program. With origins in King County, Washington the LEAD Program is privately funded by multiple sponsors and partners with ETS to help treat participants of the program. The Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) Program is gaining clout and spreading to law enforcement agencies across the US. Instead of the cyclical process of addiction arrest, jail time, release, repeat –  officials are beginning to embrace the idea that treatment rather than mandatory jail time will produce the long-term recovery results that society should really be striving toward.

chasing heroinThe “addiction epidemic” as it has been rightfully named, has been front and center in the political realm as well. Presidential hopefuls are sharing their intended plans and President Obama announced that the 2017 budget will include $1.1 billion to combat opioid use disorders with expanded access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) programs. Nevertheless, there is still a segment of the American population that refuses to accept treatment facilities into their communities, mostly for lack of opioid treatment awareness.

This past week PBS aired a powerful 2 hour Frontline Documentary, Chasing Heroin. ETS was one of the facilities featured as the documentary followed a patient into treatment. This film follows the stories of multiple people from varied backgrounds, all fighting the same fight but at different points in their recovery. A core message was that addiction is a disease not a crime and should be treated as such. Those affected are most likely to achieve success when they choose to, not when they are forced to. One police officer, who is involved in the LEAD program said that she acts as more of a “case manager” when interacting with individuals suffering from addiction. Encouraging, uplifting and caring.

Chasing Heroin is enlightening and inspiring look into the state of addiction in the U.S.  It can be viewed online at PBS.org.