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New Horizon Treatment Services, Inc.

About

New Horizon Treatment ServiceNew Horizon Treatment Services provides comprehensive multi-disciplinary outpatient, intensive outpatient and partial care addiction treatment services. Moreover, their treatment services include medicated assisted treatment options for alcohol and opiates.  Medication assisted treatment is based upon the individuals recovery needs and may include Vivitrol, Methadone or Subutex. Other services include individual and group counseling related to anxiety and stress, grief and loss, depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Testimonial

“Since converting to SMART, our Third Party Billing denial rate has steadily improved, and the rich management reporting features have been key. The support team’s can-do attitude makes all the difference. A solid system with superb support, SMART’s in for the long haul.”   

– Executive Director & Quality Assurance Officer

 

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Addiction Treatment and Prisoners

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Dr Carla Marienfeld APT Foundation

APT Foundation, a leading provider of substance use disorder, drug, alcohol, mental health and medication assisted treatment services in Connecticut, was recently interviewed by News Channel 8 (WTNH) about the efficacy of medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction.¹

When combined with a comprehensive treatment plan, addiction treatment using methadone has proven to help people reduce or quit their use of heroin or other opiates..² APT treats 4500 patients using methadone and 700 patients using buprenorphine. For methadone treatment they require a minimum of 3 years of treatment with the goal of keeping patients engaged in their own recovery. According to “addicts who do not use a supervised medication program like methadone to get clean have an 80 to 90 percent chance of relapsing in the first year.”

This article also indicted that 44% of 700 overdose deaths in the State of Connecticut were tied to individuals who were previously incarcerated. “When you combine that statistic with the fact that an inmate’s tolerance for drugs goes down while incarcerated, the result is an increased risk of overdose once they are released.”¹ Government officials have noted the success of prisoner methadone treatment programs already in place and are hoping to expand these types of programs. Dr. Kathleen Maurer, Medical Director for the Connecticut Department of Correction said the goal is to treat 1,000 prisoners a year at an estimated cost of $4 million.³

The Associated Press interviewed Connecticut-based treatment provider, Recovery Networks of Programs, Inc., who has been working directly within the jail system to provide methadone treatment for prisoners suffering from the disease of addiction. CEO John Hamilton said, “It’s the right thing to do…It’s inhumane to have someone go through withdrawal. We don’t want to see those clients suffering.” Prisoner patients also shared that their withdrawal experiences in prison often lead to their hospitalization. One such incarcerated patient said, “It was a real blessing to get back in the program and maintain my sobriety.”³

1.) http://wtnh.com/2016/04/18/connecticut-pushes-to-get-methadone-treatment-for-prisoners/

2.) http://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment/treatment/methadone

3.) http://www.nhregister.com/20160417/connecticut-to-expand-methadone-treatment-in-prisons